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  Entertainment   Bollywood  26 Jan 2018  Whose history is it anyway? Padmaavat taints Alauddin Khilji

Whose history is it anyway? Padmaavat taints Alauddin Khilji

PTI
Published : Jan 26, 2018, 4:14 am IST
Updated : Jan 26, 2018, 4:14 am IST

A section of academics believes the depiction of Khilji is only the latest move in a larger movement in parts of the country to distort history.

Shahid Kapoor and Deepika Padukone in a still from 'Padmaavat.'
 Shahid Kapoor and Deepika Padukone in a still from 'Padmaavat.'

New Delhi: He gnaws the meat off the bone, bares his hairy chest, has long unruly locks and laughs like a hyena.

History doesn’t quite remember Alauddin Khilji like this, but that is the image Sanjay Leela Bhansali seeks to portray of the Khilji dynasty king in his film Padmaavat.

 

The king is depicted almost like a barbarian in the film, which was released today after months of strife – in court, on the streets and at the Censor Board.

While members of some Rajput groups are still violently opposing the film’s release, a section of historians states that the filmmaker misses the mark, not in portraying Padmavati, a role played by Deepika Padukone, but in painting the Sultan as a barbarian.

Bhansali’s Khilji, played by Ranveer Singh, has kohl- rimmed hungry eyes, a scarred face, a gym-toned body, wears furs when he is not bare-chested and rips meat off the bone with his teeth.

Historian Rana Safvi believes that Khilji was anything but savage. It was under his rule the Delhi Sultanate heavily drew from Persia, one of the oldest and most sophisticated civilisations of all time, she said.

 

“The rulers followed the exact code of conduct and etiquette as in Persia. It would have been very formal – the eating, dining and sartorial choices,” Safvi said.

The film, according to Bhansali, is based on the 16th century-epic poem Padmavat written by Sufi poet Malik Muhammad Jayasi two centuries after Khilji’s death.

“It cannot be ignored that the epic 'Padmavat' was penned centuries after Khilji's attack. Jayasi wrote it in Awadhi, not any Rajasthani dialect. He belonged to a different region,” pointed out Arunima Gopinath, associate professor of Women's Studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University.

The poet Amir Khusro, who flourished during the Khilji rule, gave a detailed account of the king’s conquests as well as his reign in the 13th century. The poet did not project him as a barbarian ruler either.

 

Safvi added that the barbarism the film depicts in Khilji is to only show him as a villain and

Shahid Kapoor's Ratan Singh as a sophisticated rival.

“Khilji was aware he was cruel but he was not the kind to be running after women and then conquering kingdoms. He was only interested in expansions and conquests,” she said.

Alauddin was a "cruel imperialist" and a good military strategist who wanted to crush Mongol invaders, she held.

A section of academics believes the depiction of Khilji is only the latest move in a larger movement in parts of the country to distort history.

Akbar has been branded a foreigner defeated in battle and efforts are on to erase Aurangzeb's name – if not from history, at least from road signs.

 

“There is a clear pattern to colour Islamic rulers as villains with no reference to any facts based on authentic sources of information,” said Heeram Chaturvedi, head of department of history at Allahabad University.

Tags: alauddin khilji, padmaavat, sanjay leela bhansali
Location: India, Delhi, New Delhi