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  Life   Health  06 Apr 2018  Find out how you can stop falling asleep when bored

Find out how you can stop falling asleep when bored

THE ASIAN AGE WITH AGENCY INPUTS
Published : Apr 6, 2018, 2:10 pm IST
Updated : Apr 6, 2018, 4:27 pm IST

Expert says low-stress, safe environment like a lecture hall or cinema may prompt certain people to fall asleep.

According to experts, certain scenarios can lead to a “quiet mind”, free from stresses and anxieties that might otherwise occupy them. (Photo: Pixabay)
 According to experts, certain scenarios can lead to a “quiet mind”, free from stresses and anxieties that might otherwise occupy them. (Photo: Pixabay)

While there are those who can look interested even during some of the most banal conversations, there are yet others who, when facing similar situations simply fall asleep.

And since this is quite a common if only embarrassing occurrence, one wonders, why is it that some people fall asleep when they’re bored, while others can happily twiddle their thumbs till the conversation gets over?

According to sleep consultant Dr Neil Stanley, a person’s ability to fall asleep is governed by feelings of safety and security.

Speaking to The Independent, he said that a low-stress, safe environment like a lecture hall or cinema may prompt certain people to fall asleep.

Elaborating further, he said, these scenarios can lead to a “quiet mind”, free from the stresses and anxieties that might otherwise occupy us.

According to Stanley, this calm mental state is a prerequisite to sleep as it enables people to disengage from their surroundings, at times, even without realising it.

According to Christine Hansen, holistic sleep expert and spokesperson for Eve Sleep, unexpected urges to sleep during the day has little to do with boredom at all and is usually a reflection of that person’s overall energy levels rather than their disinterest.

Speaking to The Independent she said that at times people are probably already tired and need to recuperate and when given opportunity to be less alert and focused, they allow sleep to take over.

Sleep coach and clinical hypnotherapist Max Kirsten agrees that sleep deprivation is often the cause, though he adds that the majority of people don’t recognise when they are sleep-deprived, often relying on regular caffeine boosts to get by.

Combined with a low boredom tolerance and a tendency to get bored very quickly, these people start daydreaming, which can lead to nodding off.

So, what can people do to stop themselves nodding off in compromising situations?

The first, according to experts is to ensure you are actually getting enough sleep, ideally a minimum of seven hours a night.

Regular exercise can be helpful too, as this boosts metabolic rate and oxygen absorption, both of which are conducive to good sleep.

Avoiding alcohol and red meat can help too.

Tags: sleep, bored, sleeping, health and well being, sleep consultant, low-stress, safe environment, sleep expert