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  Life   Health  21 Aug 2018  Kids whose parents fought cancer have lower grades, earn less as adults, says study

Kids whose parents fought cancer have lower grades, earn less as adults, says study

THE ASIAN AGE
Published : Aug 21, 2018, 10:50 am IST
Updated : Aug 21, 2018, 10:50 am IST

According to the post study analysis, one in three people will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives.

The results showed children with experience of parental cancer had a much lower final grade average than children who did not. (Photo: Pixabay)
 The results showed children with experience of parental cancer had a much lower final grade average than children who did not. (Photo: Pixabay)

A new study has now revealed that children whose parents battled cancer have lower grades and earn less money in their chosen careers.

According to researchers, the more severe their mother or father’s cancer is, the greater impact it has on children.

 

Danish scientists examined data from more than one million people, followed until they were 30, to make the conclusion.

According to the post study analysis, one in three people will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives.

Analysts at Copenhagen University recorded the final grades of the participants at the age of 15. Their teachers were also surveyed.

Disposable income by age 30 was compiled using national data estimates, based on another 360,054 children several years older.

The results showed children with experience of parental cancer had a much lower final grade average than children who did not.

And this risk was 1.5 times higher if their mother or father's chances of surviving five years were poor, and 1.6 times higher if the parent died.

 

The risk of low attainment was even greater if it was the father who'd been affected.

No such associations were evident if the outlook was good or if the parent was alive by the child's 18th birthday.

There was also a moderately increased risk of lower earnings power by the age of 30 if a parent had had cancer.

Particularly badly affected were children who had been under five when the diagnosis was made.

This suggests that any impact of parental cancer in early childhood may extend across the life course, say the researchers.

The team of researchers published their findings in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

 

Tags: cancer, lower grades, cancer in parents, lower earnings, health and well being, disposable income