Monday, Aug 10, 2020 | Last Update : 09:01 PM IST

139th Day Of Lockdown

Maharashtra51533235171017757 Tamil Nadu2969012386384927 Andhra Pradesh2278601387122036 Karnataka178087939083198 Delhi1454271305874111 Uttar Pradesh122609726502069 West Bengal95554671202059 Bihar7972051315429 Telangana7949555999627 Gujarat71064542382652 Assam5883842326145 Rajasthan5249738235789 Odisha4592731785321 Haryana4163534781483 Madhya Pradesh3902529020996 Kerala3433121832109 Jammu and Kashmir2489717003472 Punjab2390315319586 Jharkhand185168998177 Chhatisgarh12148880996 Uttarakhand96326134125 Goa871259575 Tripura6161417641 Puducherry5382320187 Manipur3752204411 Himachal Pradesh3371218114 Nagaland27819048 Arunachal Pradesh215514823 Chandigarh151590425 Meghalaya10624906 Sikkim8664971 Mizoram6082980
  Science   11 Aug 2019  Not so easy for mainstream brands to go green: Study

Not so easy for mainstream brands to go green: Study

ANI
Published : Aug 11, 2019, 11:38 am IST
Updated : Aug 11, 2019, 11:38 am IST

Survey participants were shown the full-size packages for all three brands and asked to evaluate them.

The researchers found that when survey participants were shown the package with a green cue, they perceived the product to be more environmentally friendly
 The researchers found that when survey participants were shown the package with a green cue, they perceived the product to be more environmentally friendly

Researchers have found that when mainstream brands advertise that their product is environmentally friendly or 'green', consumers may actually evaluate the claim and switch to a more niche green brand.

Researchers conducted a survey of 565 consumers from across the US to determine their choice among three real pesticide brands and whether a green cue (an earth image) on the product label of the largest mainstream competitor influenced this choice.

 

Four hundred and twenty of the individuals surveyed identified themselves as those who bought pesticides and 352 responded "yes" when asked if they considered themselves "a consumer who prioritises 'environmental friendliness' in purchase decisions."

The study, recently published in the journal of Marketing Research, focused on one mainstream product from a large multinational company (the target brand), a second mainstream product with significant market share (the mainstream competitor), and one brand that sold only eco-friendly products (green competitor).

Survey participants were shown the full-size packages for all three brands and asked to evaluate them, however, there were three different product labels used for the target brand. One group of participants saw the standard target brand packaging with no added cue. A second group saw the target brand's packaging with a safety cue (an image of a home-in-hands). The final group saw the target brand's packaging with a green cue (an image of the earth).

 

The results showed that the choice share of the target brand differed based on the product label used on the package. When the survey participants were shown the package with the standard label with no cue or the safety cue, the choice share was similar at 43.6 per cent and 43.4 per cent respectively. In comparison, when participants were shown the package with the green cue label, the choice share dropped to 33 per cent.

Upon further questioning, the researchers found that when survey participants were shown the package with a green cue, they perceived the product to be more environmentally friendly and less effective in its performance, thus leading them to be less inclined to purchase it.

 

The researchers noted that while the packaging isn't the only attribute prompting consumer behaviour, the colours, images, and verbiage used on packaging labels seem to have a noteworthy impact on influencing consumer's decisions when considering a "green product."

"At one point, Clorox removed some of the environmental-friendly cues from the labels of their Green Works product line when sales started to decline. While Clorox didn't say why they took these steps, it certainly mirrors the results of our study. Our findings seem to indicate that mainstream green brands should consider keeping information about environmental friendliness under the radar and promote their products' performance instead," said one of the researchers of the study, Dr Morgan Poor.

 

Tags: eco friendly